Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots

Nanoparticles and Quantum Dots

Description

The aim of the Nanoparticle and Quantum Dot Research Group is to synthesise and characterize novel, cutting edge nanoparticle materials.

Expertise

The aim of the Nanoparticle and Quantum Dot Research Group is to synthesise and characterize novel, cutting edge nanoparticle materials. We approach this problem using solution phase chemical techniques which allow for the synthesis of very uniform nanoparticles with superb control over their size and shape. The nanoparticles are characterised using a wide range of techniques with particular focus on high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM).

Objective

The aim of the Nanoparticle and Quantum Dot Research Group is to synthesise and characterize novel, cutting edge nanoparticle materials.

Research Focus

Quantum dots

We research in numerous applications of quantum dots and in their synthesis. A quantum dot is a nanoparticle made from semiconductors. These materials fluoresce with visible light when illuminated with ultra–violet light and this makes them promising candidates for many future applications.

Magnetic nanoparticles

Magnetic nanoparticles are currently the subject of intense research worldwide. Our group's research target is to improve on the standard particles. We do have a strong focus towards the application of our particles in MRI contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

Catalysis / shape control

In this research project we focus on the shape–controlled synthesis of a range of late transition metal nanoparticles.

Unique Capability Proposition

The group has three major research interests in Nano-technology (quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and catalysis/shape control) which develop their unique set of capabilities.

Past Successes

In June, group supervisor Assoc. Prof. Richard Tilley was invited to deliver a talk at the International Conference on Materials for Advanced Technologies, ICMAT 2011 in Singapore. Accompanied by PhD student Dave Herman, they were the only representatives from NZ at the conference which had over 2600 delegates from over 30 countries. Assoc. Prof. Richard Tilley delivered an overview of the groups magnetic nanoparticle project and Dave complimented his talk with a poster presentation on his iron nanoparticle research, which won a best poster presentation award. This was the first time results from the groups magnetic project had been presented at an international conference, and was recieved very well.